As the election day rapidly approach, now’s the time to get smart on what to expect when you look at your 2018 ballots. First thing’s first though, let’s talk about voter registration and ballot procedures.

Are you registered to vote?

If you know you aren’t registered to vote, you can do so online and receive a mailed ballot until October 29. You can still register up to election day on November 6, but you will have to vote in-person.

If you aren’t sure, or have changed addresses since the last election, visit the Colorado Secretary of State website to check your status. You can change your address directly from your summary page.

How are ballots distributed and returned?

Every registered voter will receive their ballot in the mail, which will start being distributed on October 15. You can mail it back (use two stamps!) or drop it off in person at approved locations (which vary county to county). Remember that ballots must be received by November 6, so think ahead if mailing your ballot.

You can always vote in-person as well, even if you get your ballot is mailed to you. Check your city or county websites for polling locations and days/hours of operation. Locations are typically open for 7 days before election day itself.

Guide to Key 2018 Races in Colorado

AIA Colorado does not endorse candidates as an organization. ARCpac and ARCsdc typically make monetary contributions only to candidates running the Colorado state legislature.

Here we’ll list Democratic and Republican candidates in every statewide race, every congressional district race, and select races in the state legislature where candidates have received contributions. Most-recent elected offices are listed where applicable. Full details can be found at each candidate’s websites, linked below.

If you’re looking for detailed, non-partisan information on any race in the state, Ballotpedia.org/Colorado is recommended.

Statewide Races, (Four-year term, Two-term limit)

The Governor’s race is always high-profile but learning about the other races is worth your time as well. The Secretary of State’s primary responsibility is managing an ensuring fair elections and voter registration. The Treasurer position is more administrative in nature, but also includes managing investments in addition to our state treasury. The Attorney General often finds themself representing the state when there are disagreements with Federal policies.

Governor

With Governor John Hickenlooper (D) termed out, there’s no incumbent running in 2018.

  • Republican: Walker Stapleton, Colorado Treasurer (2011-current)
    • Running Mate: Lang Sias, State Representative; HD27 (2015-current)
  • Democrat: Jared Polis, US Representative; CD02 (2009-current)
    • Running Mate: Dianne Primavera, State Representative; HD33 (2013-2017)

Attorney General

Current Attorney General Cynthia Coffman (R) chose to pursue the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018 instead of running for re-election.

Secretary of State

Current Secretary of State Wayne Williams (R) is running for re-election this year.

Treasurer

Current Treasurer Walker Stapleton (R) is the Republican candidate for Governor in 2018, so there is no incumbent in this race.

  • Democrat: Dave Young, State Representative; HD50 (2011-current)
  • Republican: Brian Watson, first-time candidate

Colorado State Legislature (House: 2-year terms, Senate: four-year terms, eight-year term limit)

ARCpac and ARCsdc are supporting the following candidates in house and senate races across the state:

Boulder Metro Area

Edie Hooton (D-Boulder) HD10

KC Becker (D-Boulder) HD13

Colorado Springs Metro Area

Lois Landgraf (R-Colorado Springs) HD21

Paul Lundeen (R-Monument) SD09

Pete Lee (D-Colorado Springs) SD11

Terri Carver (R-Colorado Springs) HD20

Denver Central Metro Area

James Coleman (D-Denver) HD7

Alex Valdez (D-Denver) HD05

Denver East Metro Area

Cole Wist (R-Arapahoe County) HD37

Dafna Michaelson Jenet, (D-Adams County) HD30

Denver North Metro Area

Faith Winter (D-Westminster) SD24

Kyle Mullica (D-Northglenn) HD34

Shannon Bird (D-Westminster) HD35

Tracy Kraft Tharpe (D-Arvada) HD29

Yadira Caraveo (D-Thornton) HD31

Denver South Metro Area

Chris Holbert (R-Parker) SD30

Kevin Van Winkle (R-Highlands Ranch) HD43

Denver West Metro Area

Brittany Petterson (D-Lakewood) SD28

Kerry Tipper (D-Lakewood) HD28

Lang Sias (R-Arvada) HD 27

Mountain West

Julie McCluskie (D-Dillon) HD61

Dylan Roberts (D-Eagle) HD26

Northern Colorado

Jeni Arndt (D-Fort Collins) HD53

John Cooke (R-Greeley) SD13

Southern Colorado

Brianna Buentello (D-Pueblo) HD47

Leroy Garcia (D-Pueblo) SD03

Western Slope

Barbara McLachlan (D-Durango) HD59

Janice Rich (R-Grand Junction) HD55

Matt Soper (R-Delta) HD54

State Board of Education (six-year term, two-term limit)

This board provides general oversight of K-12 public schools, with one board member per state congressional district (7 total members).

State Board of Education, Congressional District 2

State Board of Education, Congressional District 4

  • Republican: Debora Scheffel, State Board of Education (2011-2016, 2018)
    • Note: Appointed by vacancy committee in February 2018 for retiring member
  • Democrat: Tim Krug, first-time candidate

State Board of Regents (six-year term, two-term limit)

This board provides general oversight of University of Colorado system, with one board member per state congressional district and two at-large members (9 total members).

State Board of Regents, At Large

  • Democrat: Lesley Smith, local district Board of Education (2006-2013)
  • Republican: Ken Montera, first-time candidate

State Board of Regents, Congressional District 3 

State Board of Regents, Congressional District 5 

US House of Representative Races (two-year term, no term limits)

Members of the House of Representatives are elected every two years. Incumbents are running in six of our seven districts, with Jared Polis running for Governor instead of for re-election in CD02.

US House, Congressional District 1 

US House, Congressional District 2 

  • Democrat: Joe Neguse, CU Board of Regents (2009-2014)
  • Republican: Peter Yu, first-time candidate

US House, Congressional District 3 

US House, Congressional District 4 

US House, Congressional District 5 

US House, Congressional District 6 

US House, Congressional District 7